These policies vary widely. Marijuana and CBD are currently fully legal for both medicinal and recreational purposes in Alaska, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and Washington D.C. In 23 states, it's legal in some form, such as for medicinal purposes. Another 14 states permit just CBD oil. But both are illegal in Idaho, Nebraska, and South Dakota. For more information, the organization Americans for Safe Access has a helpful guide to the specific laws in each state.
The smoke point is the temperature that causes oil to start smoking, which produces toxic fumes and harmful free radicals (the stuff we’re trying to avoid). Because of their chemical makeup, different oils have different smoke points. So some oils are better suited for cooking at higher temperatures than others. A good rule of thumb is that the more refined the oil, the higher the smoke point. Vegetable, peanut and sesame oils have the highest smoke points. Note: Smoke point relates only to fresh oil; oil that is used for cooking and then strained and re-used loses its integrity.
Technically speaking, its THC—the cannabinoid that gets you high—which is illicit. When you take a drug test, the aim is to detect THC in your body, not “cannabis.” If you possessed weed without any THC in it, technically you wouldn’t be in violation of the law. Because “weed” without THC has a different name: hemp. And the rules governing hemp are quite different from the restrictions placed on cannabis.
It’s also one of the strongest and most concentrated CBD products on the market today. With a grain-of-rice-sized recommended serving taken orally twice a day, its potent punch acts quickly—in just ten to fifteen minutes—to provide powerful relief. Furthermore, it offers terrific value for your money, boasting more CBD per dollar than many other CBD products.
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