Clinical cases are now being described where SC users are presenting with seizures or convulsions. In the United States, there have been reports of seizure activity after smoking various SCB and these were likely JWH-018, JWH-081, JWH-250, and AM-2201 (Lapoint et al., 2011; Schneir & Baumbacher, 2012; Simmons, Cookman, Kang, & Skinner, 2011). In Europe, McQuade et al. (2013) reported a 20-year-old male who had smoked “Black Mamba” and quickly went into tonic–clonic convulsions. Urine analysis revealed metabolites of AM-2201.
Sleep disturbance is a common side-effect of marijuana withdrawal. Among 1735 frequent users of marijuana (>21 occasions in a single year), 235 (13.5%) reported difficulty sleeping during withdrawal (Wiesbeck et al., 1996). Difficulty falling asleep and decreased SWS% have been documented during the first two nights (Freemon, 1982) of withdrawal. While acute exposure to low doses (2 mg) of THC decreases REM sleep (Pivik et al., 1972), there is no REM sleep rebound during the withdrawal period (Freemon, 1974). Higher doses (70–210 mg), on the other hand, resulted in REM sleep rebound during withdrawal (Feinberg et al., 1976). Daytime consequences are reported following higher doses of THC, including mild hangovers (Cousens and Dimascio, 1973), increased sleepiness, mood changes, and impaired memory (Nicholson et al., 2004). Objective methods of assessing sleepiness, such as the MSLT, have not been utilized to assess daytime consequences of THC.
The recreational smoking of marijuana, or Cannabis sativa, has become widespread, including among adolescents. Marijuana contains a class of compounds known as phytocannabinoids that include cannabidiol (CBD) and ▵9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the major psychoactive component in marijuana, but also exhibits immunosuppressive activity. CBD, while not psychotropic, also modulates immune function, but its mechanism of action appears to differ from that of THC. Since both compounds are highly lipophilic, they readily passage the blood–brain barrier and access the central nervous system. Since CBD is not psychotropic, it has been considered as a candidate therapeutic compound for ablating neuropathological processes characterized by hyperinflammation. However, an unresolved question centers around the impact of these compounds on immune-competent cells within the CNS in relation to susceptibility to infection. There are accumulating data indicating that THC inhibits the migratory capability of macrophage-like cells resident in the CNS, such as microglia, toward nodes of microbial invasion. Furthermore, phytocannabinoids have been reported to exert developmental and long-term effects on the immune system suggesting that exposure to these substances during an early stage in life has the potential to alter the fundamental neuroimmune response to select microbial agents in the adult.
My mother has dementia/Alzheimers along with a broken knee that they will not repair do to her mental status. She is currently in a nursing home. I firmly believe her mental situation began with the over use of hydrocodone for over 30 years and was acerbated by the trauma of breaking and disconnecting her knee cap. Since weaning her off of her meds (still in progress) we have regained much of her consciousness. I want to try CBD to help in her recovery or to help slow down the disease. I cannot find a dosage recommendation plus the nursing home/doctor does not recommend it. I would need to give it to her when I am there visiting (about 3 - 4 times per week). Is there a recommended dosage for dementia/Alzheimers?
In addition to acting on the brain, CBD influences many body processes. That’s due to the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which was discovered in the 1990s, after scientists started investigating why pot produces a high. Although much less well-known than the cardiovascular, reproductive, and respiratory systems, the ECS is critical. “The ECS helps us eat, sleep, relax, forget what we don’t need to remember, and protect our bodies from harm,” Marcu says. There are more ECS receptors in the brain than there are for opioids or serotonin, plus others in the intestines, liver, pancreas, ovaries, bone cells, and elsewhere.
Butter substitutes like margarine, smart balance and earth balance are mostly a mix of canola and soybean oils. You can revisit #2 & #3 of this list to read more details about why these oils are not healthy, but basically, soybean oil is too high in omega-6 fatty acids which can lead to inflammation and other diseases. Canola oil is highly processed and treated with chemical deodorizers and solvents.
Collin, C., Ehler, E., Waberzinek, G., Alsindi, Z., Davies, P., Powell, K., Notcutt, W., O'Leary, C., Ratcliffe, S., Novakova, I., Zapletalova, O., Pikova, J., and Ambler, Z. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of Sativex, in subjects with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis. Neurol.Res. 2010;32(5):451-459. View abstract. 

Oils, oils, oils. When it comes to cooking oils, there are oh so many to choose from. Yes, we all know and love olive oil, but it's definitely not the only one you should be using. Different oils have different qualities that make them better for different uses. Some are best for baking, some are best for frying, and some are best in salad dressings. But which is best for which?
Due to its high content of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, hemp oil has a composition similar to skin lipids, which makes it an excellent natural emollient and moisturizer. It is especially useful for dry, tired or dehydrated skin and nails. It increases the skin elasticity and water retention capacity in tissues. Pure hemp oil can be used to treat dry hair and is often included in hair conditioners.
Despite these concerns, Ziva Cooper, an associate professor of clinical neurobiology at Columbia University's Irving Medical Center, who is doing research with CBD, says "based on animal studies, there seems to be a lot of promise for a number of disease states," including its potential effects on inflammation, which could make it effective against multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disorders and addiction. More important, she told me, CBD may be therapeutic for "ailments for which there aren't necessarily great medicines" — such as those pediatric seizure disorders and many others.

If you’re taking the oil in liquid form, one dropperful of a low concentration product (100 mg CBD per fluid ounce) will provide about 3 mg of CBD per dropperful — not enough to notice any significant effects. A dropperful of the medium grade product (500 mg of CBD per fluid ounce) will deliver about 15 mg of CBD — a good starting dose. And a dropperful of a high concentration product (1500 mg CBD per fluid ounce) will provide about 50 mg of CBD per dropperful.

Unfortunately due to the disappointing and down right inaccurate position of the federal government in classifying Cannabis as a schedule one drug, most research institutions risk federal funding if they conduct real research on Cannabis. This has dramatically limited the potential for real research by real scientists to be conducted. That research is critical to better understanding the multitude of therapeutic effects of the various chemical constituents found in Cannabis.


The active ingredient in marijuana is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol is an extract of THC that can be measured along with THC in laboratory research settings. The effects of acute exposure of marijuana on sleep are similar to some hypnotics because they can induce sleep (Hollister, 2001), slightly decrease REM sleep (Pivik et al., 1972), and adversely affect sleep upon withdrawal (Wiesbeck et al., 1996). Doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg THC prior to sleep have decreased SOL after subjects reported achieving a “high” subjectively (Cousens and Dimascio, 1973). There is an initial increase in S4 sleep with THC (Pivik et al., 1972; Feinberg et al., 1975, 1976), but more recent studies have found that 15 mg THC and 5 mg cannabidiol before bed decreased S3 sleep (Nicholson et al., 2004). Prolonged ROL (Nicholson et al., 2004), reduced eye movements, and reduced REM sleep duration have also been noted (Pivik et al., 1972).
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