Many cells in the body have what are called cannabinoid receptors, protein molecules on a cell’s surface that react when they come in contact with certain chemical substances. Different receptors react with different substances to cause different reactions – for instance, the release of a hormone or other chemical. The cells that react with cannabinoids comprise what’s known as the endocannabinoid system. When these receptors are activated, they exert an effect on mood, pain sensation, appetite and other biologic responses.

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For reasons discussed previously, despite its molecular similarity to THC, CBD only interacts with cannabinoid receptors weakly at very high doses (100 times that of THC),xl and the alterations in thinking and perception caused by THC are not observed with CBD.iii.iv,v The different pharmacological properties of CBD give it a different safety profile from THC.
Generally speaking, there’s a lot of hype around coconut products that overall aren’t backed by sound science. That’s not to say this oil is going to make you sick, but don’t go overboard. “I am not anti-coconut oil,” says Weinandy. “Our bodies do need some saturated fat. But the industry has done a good job to make it seem like it’s a superfood. The research is definitely not there.”
Answering the question “what is CBD oil” would be incomplete without mentioning the many CBD oil benefits. In addition to positively affecting the endocannabinoid system, CBD has been the focus of more than 23,000 published studies about cannabinoids in relation to various medical indications including anxiety, epilepsy, inflammation, cancer and chronic pain to name few. You can even find CBD for pets that is specially formulated to safely allow your pets to experience the natural benefits of CBD. For a more comprehensive look at these and other studies, visit our medical research and education page. Stay up-to-date on the latest developments in CBD and cannabis in our medical marijuana news section.
Cannabinoids have long been considered as potential treatments for tremors associated with various CNS disorders, e.g., multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease (Arjmand et al., 2015) and this is described later. However, some studies suggest caution in the use of SCB in these diseases and in mice the synthetic CB receptor agonists CP55,940 and HU-210 evoked motor impairment (DeSanty & Dar, 2001). The phytocannabinoid nabilone increases choreatic movements in Huntington's disease (Müller-Vahl, Schneider, & Emrich, 1999). The motor centers of the brain including the basal ganglia and the cerebellum contain very high CB1 receptor levels and thus one might expect SCB to have a significant effect on such symptoms as tremor.
Although cannabidiol (CBD) is permitted according to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), all other cannabinoids are still prohibited in-competition. It’s important to realize that CBD products may still contain prohibited cannabinoid components, such as THC. Athletes subject to anti-doping rules are strictly liable for any substance found in their blood or urine. As such, there are still risks for athletes when it comes to CBD products.
Combining the powerful properties of CBD with a unique mix of herbs and other all-natural ingredients, this Hemp Signature Blend from Bluebird Botanicals offers real and effective relief from the symptoms of inflammation. Designed to support your body and soothe your joints, this is CBD oil redefined. The fascinating inclusion of frankincense carteri, black cumin seed, cold-pressed oil, and rosemary extract marks this out as something special.
A major goal of acute stroke care entails salvaging the penumbra and extra-penumbral regions of brain by preventing further growth of the infarct zone. Necrosis and apoptosis within the stroke core lead to free radical formation, glutamate release, and an inflammatory cascade leading to accumulation of intracellular calcium and cell death [12]. Endocannabinoids accumulate in ischemic tissue with CB 1 receptor (CB1 receptor) activation resulting in neuroprotective mechanisms including inhibition of glutamate release, decrease in intracellular calcium, hypothermia, decreased reactive oxygen species, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). CB 2 receptor (CB2 receptor) activation leads to a decrease of leukocyte adhesion and cytokine release [12].
Many cells in the body have what are called cannabinoid receptors, protein molecules on a cell’s surface that react when they come in contact with certain chemical substances. Different receptors react with different substances to cause different reactions – for instance, the release of a hormone or other chemical. The cells that react with cannabinoids comprise what’s known as the endocannabinoid system. When these receptors are activated, they exert an effect on mood, pain sensation, appetite and other biologic responses.
Generally speaking, there’s a lot of hype around coconut products that overall aren’t backed by sound science. That’s not to say this oil is going to make you sick, but don’t go overboard. “I am not anti-coconut oil,” says Weinandy. “Our bodies do need some saturated fat. But the industry has done a good job to make it seem like it’s a superfood. The research is definitely not there.”

When it comes to your health, "fat" is not necessarily a dirty word. You need some fat in your diet, and it actually performs some pretty impressive tasks like boosting energy, supporting cell growth, protecting your organs, keeping your body warm, and aiding in nutrient absorption and the manufacturing of hormones, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). And oils can be a great source of these healthy fats, but choosing the right variety is key.
Cannabidiol is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth or sprayed under the tongue appropriately. Cannabidiol in doses of up to 300 mg daily have been taken by mouth safely for up to 6 months. Higher doses of 1200-1500 mg daily have been taken by mouth safely for up to 4 weeks. A prescription cannabidiol product (Epidiolex) is approved to be taken by mouth in doses of up to 10-20 mg/kg daily. Cannabidiol sprays that are applied under the tongue have been used in doses of 2.5 mg for up to 2 weeks.
Excessive amounts of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a very high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, as is found in today’s Western diets, promote the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, whereas increased levels of omega-3 PUFA (a lower omega-6/omega-3 ratio), exert suppressive effects.”
As for phytocannabinoid-rich hemp oil, due to the presence of the hemp plant’s cannabinoids there are many additional uses and benefits with practically zero side effects. The most common use of this type of hemp oil is for chronic pain management, but many people also use it to treat some symptoms of cancer, among other diseases and conditions. Even the Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new CBD-based prescription medication.
I have dealt with overall muscle pain for several years and was finally diagnosed with fibromyalgia 6 months ago. Due to stomach issues, I am no longer able to take NSAIDs, and I don’t want to start down the opioid trail, so I’ve been pretty miserable. Most days I felt like I’d been hit by a truck, and by the end of a work day, I was done. Many evenings I had to use a foam roller on my neck, back, and legs before I could even think of going to bed, and just trying to sit and relax was sometimes impossible. My husband did a lot of research on CBD oil, and Medterra seemed to be a solid company with a good following. He got me a bottle of the 1,000mg tincture, and I “front-loaded” with two doses a day for the first 5 days, then went down to one 1ml dose each morning. Even though we were on a lake vacation and I was climbing in and out of the boat and bouncing around the lake, I noticed that the pain and achiness in my arms and legs was gone within the first couple of days. After a couple more days, I realized that the pain and tightness in my upper back/neck were nearly gone as well. I’m starting to get my “old” energy back, and I can focus on doing what I want to do without the pain constantly interfering. My next order will be for the 3,000mg tincture... I want to play with the dosing a bit and see if I can get some relief with lower back pain (unrelated to the fibro). If you’re dealing with muscle pain, I highly recommend giving Medterra CBD oil a try.
The active ingredient in marijuana is delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabidiol is an extract of THC that can be measured along with THC in laboratory research settings. The effects of acute exposure of marijuana on sleep are similar to some hypnotics because they can induce sleep (Hollister, 2001), slightly decrease REM sleep (Pivik et al., 1972), and adversely affect sleep upon withdrawal (Wiesbeck et al., 1996). Doses of 10, 20, and 30 mg THC prior to sleep have decreased SOL after subjects reported achieving a “high” subjectively (Cousens and Dimascio, 1973). There is an initial increase in S4 sleep with THC (Pivik et al., 1972; Feinberg et al., 1975, 1976), but more recent studies have found that 15 mg THC and 5 mg cannabidiol before bed decreased S3 sleep (Nicholson et al., 2004). Prolonged ROL (Nicholson et al., 2004), reduced eye movements, and reduced REM sleep duration have also been noted (Pivik et al., 1972).
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